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Believe It! Smart Bulbs to Now Help in Data Exfiltration

Checkmarx

Imagining mobile applications exploiting smart bulbs for data exfiltration seems an unbelievable reality.
Security researchers with Checkmarx developed two mobile applications that exploit smart bulbs features for data exfiltration.

The experts used the Magic Blue smart bulbs that implement communication through Bluetooth 4.0.

The devices are manufactured by the Chinese company called Zengge and could be controlled using both Android and iOS apps.

The company supplies major brands like Philips and Osram etc. The experts focused their study on devices using the Low Energy Attribute Protocol (ATT) to communicate.

The first test made by the experts consisted of sniffing communication between the smart bulbs and the paired Mobile Application. The pairing method used by the researcher is Just Works.

The experts paired the Android mobile phone with the iLight app and started sniffing the traffic while changing the colors of the smart bulbs.

In this way, the researchers discovered the commands sent by the mobile app to the smart bulbs. The team made a reverse engineering of the Mobile Application using the jadx tool.

Once gained the complete control of the bulbs, experts started working on an application that leverages the light of the bulbs to transfer information from a compromised device to the attacker.

“The main plan for exfiltration was to use light as a channel to transfer information from a compromised device to the attacker. Light can achieve longer distances, which was our goal.” reads the analysis published by the experts.

“Imagine the following attack scenario: a BLE device (smartphone) gets compromised with malware. The malware steals the user’s credentials. The stolen information is sent to an attacker using a BLE light bulb nearby.”

Once gained the complete control of the bulbs, experts started working on an application that leverages the light of the bulbs to transfer information from a compromised device to the attacker.

“The main plan for exfiltration was to use light as a channel to transfer information from a compromised device to the attacker. Light can achieve longer distances, which was our goal.” reads the analysis published by the experts.

“Imagine the following attack scenario: a BLE device (smartphone) gets compromised with malware. The malware steals the user’s credentials. The stolen information is sent to an attacker using a BLE light bulb nearby.”

“These methods will work on every smart bulb that allows control by an attacker. In the future, we would like to create a better proof of concept that allows us to test a database of vulnerable bulbs and even implement AI to learn and implement new bulbs along the way,” Checkmarx concludes.

The article is a syndicate and has been taken from: securityaffairs.co

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