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Renesas Advanced Automotive SoC Adopted by Continental

Renesas Electronics Corporation has announced that Continental has adopted Renesas’ high-performance Renesas R-Car M3 System-on-Chip (SoC) for its first-generation Body High-Performance Computer (HPC). The HPC is an automotive computing platform that provides centralized control of vehicle systems and is equipped with secure gateway functionality to enable cloud service connectivity.

RenesasThe R-Car M3 supports over-the-air (OTA) software updates with the highest level of security and functional safety, making it possible to centrally control automotive software updates. The R-Car M3 also contributes to the realization of the new electrical/electronic (E/E) architecture concept that helps to improve vehicle performance, safety, and reliability while reducing vehicle weight.

“Thanks to the new server architecture, vehicles will be kept up to date easier and faster than today. We are making the vehicle an integral part of the Internet of Everything, contributing to the higher functionality and comfort in the vehicle,” said Johann Hiebl, head of the Connected Car Networking business unit at Continental. “The first generation of Continental’s Body High-Performance Computer using the high-performance R-Car SoC is already going into production at a global vehicle manufacturer.”

“Renesas focuses on achieving an optimal balance between performance and power efficiency for our automotive customers, with a view toward device adoption in high-volume vehicles,” said Shingo Yamamoto, Executive Vice President and General Manager of the Automotive Solution Business Unit at Renesas. “I am delighted that Continental has recognized our commitment and adopted the R-Car M3 for use in their Body HPC. We look forward to working with Continental to promote the next-generation E/E architecture that enables end-to-end solutions based on hardware and software that are cost competitive but also highly innovative.”

Whether used for personal use, as taxis, or for mobility services such as for the distribution of goods, modern vehicles must be capable of quickly updating software in the field in order to operate efficiently and safely. Performing software updates individually on the dozens of electronic control units (ECUs) installed in a typical vehicle is very difficult. The current shift toward a new E/E architecture that utilizes a central vehicle computer to implement centralized software updates will address this challenge.

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Nitisha Dubey

I am a Journalist with a post graduate degree in Journalism & Mass Communication. I love reading non-fiction books, exploring different destinations and varieties of cuisines. Biographies and historical movies are few favourites.

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